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July 12, 2017

This summer, in cornfields in Iowa and Nebraska, about a thousand small point-and-shoot digital cameras will be enclosed in waterproof cases, mounted on poles and attached to solar-powered battery chargers.

July 11, 2017

Brugia malayi, the parasitic nematode shown here, infects around 2 million people in tropical regions of Africa, South America and Asia.  AMES, Iowa – Recently published research from Iowa State University biomedical scientists details new methods for studying a parasitic nematode that sickens millions worldwide, a development that could lead to improved therapies.  Richard Martin, a Distinguished Professor of biomedical sciences, has developed a means of determining the function of individual genes in Brugia malayi, a parasitic nematode that threatens populations in tropical regions of Africa, South America and Asia. The advancement will allow researchers to evaluate treatments that combat the disease caused by the parasites. The new method also may help scientists understand how the parasites develop resistance to medication, Martin said.

July 11, 2017

Ask people in the research business if they have a wish list, and many will answer in the affirmative.  “There are always different things you want to see done,” says Jim Reecy, an animal scientist and director of the Office of Biotechnology at Iowa State University.  Much of Reecy’s work involve

July 11, 2017

When you drive over Gateway Bridge from Iowa to Illinois you’ll reach the Thomson Causeway Recreation Area, an island campground in the middle of the Mississippi River surrounded by marshland.

July 11, 2017

John NasonAmes, Iowa — John Nason has been named the chair of the Department of Ecolo

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